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Snoring can be cured completely
2018-03-22 18:49:50
Snoring can be cured completely

Snoring can be cured completely

Snoring is the vibration of respiratory structures and the resulting sound due to obstructed air movement during breathing while sleeping. In some cases, the sound may be soft, but in most cases, it can be loud and unpleasant. Snoring during sleep may be a sign, or first alarm, of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Research suggests that snoring is one of the factors of sleep deprivation

The symptoms associated with OSA are:

Snoring

Fatigue

Witnessed breath – holds

Gasping and choking

Excessive Daytime Sleeping(EDS)

Fragmented Sleep

Unrefreshing sleep

Reduced alertness

Mood changes

Nocturia

 Treatment

Almost all treatments for snoring revolve around lessening the breathing discomfort by clearing the blockage in the air passage. Medications are sometimes helpful in treating snoring symptoms, though they actually help to control some of the underlying causes such as nasal congestion and allergic reactions. Doctors, therefore, often recommend lifestyle changes as a first line treatment to stop snoring. This is the reason snorers are advised to lose weight (to stop fat from pressing on the throat), stop smoking (smoking weakens and clogs the throat), avoid alcohol and sedative medications before bedtime (they relax the throat and tongue muscles, which in turn narrow the airways) and sleep on their side (to prevent the tongue from blocking the throat).A number of other treatment options are also used to stop snoring. These range from over-the-counter aids such as nasal sprays, nasal strips or nose clips, lubricating sprays, oral appliances and "anti-snore" clothing and pillows, to unusual activities such as playing the didgeridoo. However, one needs to be wary of over-the-counter snore treatments that have no scientific evidence to support their claims, such as stop-snore rings or wrist worn electrical stimulation bands.Various surgeries can be done to treat snoring and sleep apnea like uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, laser assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency tissue volume reduction, nasal surgeries etc.

To know more please contact:

Dr. Jyotirmoy Biswas

 For knowledge:

Myths and facts of snoring:

 Myth: Everybody snores, therefore it's normal.

Fact: Snoring is not a normal condition. Labelling it as 'normal' diminishes the seriousness of the condition. Snoring is not just about annoying your partner, it is a sign that the body is struggling to breathe properly during the night. Snoring on a frequent or regular basis has been associated with hypertension and can also be an indication of sleep apnea (pauses in breathing). Sleep apnea sufferers have been reported to have diminished gray cells in their brains, most likely due to the oxygen deprivation of untreated sleep apnea. If left untreated, sleep apnea increases the risk of cardiovascular disease over time. In addition, insufficient sleep affects growth hormone secretion that is linked to obesity. As the amount of hormone secretion decreases, the chance of weight gain increases

Myth: Snoring only affects the health of the snorer.

Fact: Snoring doesn't just negatively affect the health of the person snoring, but also the health of the person lying next to them in bed. A typical snorer usually produces a noise that averages around 60 decibels (about the level of vacuum cleaner), but with some people this can reach 80 or even 90 decibels (about the level of an average factory). Sleeping with a partner who snores during the night has been shown to increase the blood pressure in the other person, which may be dangerous for their health in the long term. Snoring also causes the partner to have fragmented sleep and lose up to one hour of sleep every night.

Myth: Snoring comes from the nose, so if I unclog my nose, my snoring will stop.

Fact: Having a stuffy nose can definitely aggravate snoring and sleep apnea, but in it's not the cause. A recent study showed that undergoing nasal surgery for breathing problems cured sleep apnea in only 10% of patients. Snoring vibrations typically come from the soft palate, which is aggravated by having a small jaw and the tongue falling back. It's a complicated relationship between the nose, the soft palate and the tongue.

Myth: I know I don't snore, or have apnea. I am fine.

Fact: Don't ignore your wife when she tells you that your snoring doesn't let her sleep. When a partner snores it is very difficult for the spouse to sleep. There are people who snore excessively and suffer from sleep apnea, but feel absolutely normal. However, snoring increases their risk of getting a heart attack and stroke. The only definitive way to prove that you don't have sleep apnea is by taking a sleep test. Screening questionnaires like the GASP or the Epworth have shown high reliability in identifying patient risk for sleep apnea.

 Myth: If I lose weight, I'll cure myself of sleep apnea.

Fact: Sometimes. It's definitely worth trying, but in general, it's very difficult to lose weight if you have sleep apnea. This is because poor sleep aggravates weight gain by increasing your appetite. Once you're sleeping better, it'll be easier to lose weight. This is the one ingredient with many dietary and weight loss programs that's missing or not stressed at all. It's not enough just to tell people to sleep more.

 Myth: Health problems such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension and depression have no relation to the amount and quality of a person's sleep.

Fact: More and more scientific studies are showing a correlation between poor quality sleep and insufficient sleep with a variety of diseases. Blood pressure is variable during the sleep cycle, however, interrupted sleep negatively affects the normal variability. Recent studies have shown that nearly 80% cases of hypertension, 60% cases of strokes and 50% cases of heart failures are actually cases of undiagnosed sleep apnea. Research indicates that insufficient sleep impairs the body's ability to use insulin, which can lead to the onset of diabetes. Fragmented sleep can cause a lowered metabolism and increased levels of the hormone Cortisol which results in an increased appetite and a decrease in one's ability to burn calories.

Myth: Daytime sleepiness means a person is not getting enough sleep.

Fact: Do you feel very sleepy even during the day despite the fact that you had a long night of proper sleep? Excessive daytime sleepiness can occur even after a person gets enough sleep. Such sleepiness can be a sign of an underlying medical condition or sleep disorder such as narcolepsy or sleep apnea. Please seek professional medical advice to correctly diagnose the cause of this symptom.

 Myth: Sleep apnea occurs only in older, overweight men with big necks.

 

Fact: Although the stereotypical description does fit people in the extreme end of the spectrum, we now know that even young, thin women that don't snore can have significant obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep apnea begins with jaw structure narrowing and later involves obesity. It's estimated that 90% of women with this condition are not diagnosed. Untreated, it can cause or aggravate weight gain, depression, anxiety, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, heart attack and stroke.

Myth: Snoring can't be treated.

 Fact: Have you given up on your snoring thinking that it cannot be treated? There are many different options for treating snoring.

 

Some treatment options are rather drastic, possibly requiring surgery or prescription drugs, but prior to exploring such options it would be wise to first seek out alternative treatments. You must visit a sleep specialist to get the right diagnosis.

Myth: Extra sleep at night can cure you of problems with excessive daytime fatigue.

Fact: Not only is the quantity of sleep important but also the quality of sleep. Some people sleep eight-nine hours a night but don't feel well rested as the quality of their sleep is poor. A number of sleep disorders and other medical conditions affect the quality of sleep. Sleeping more won't alleviate the daytime sleepiness these disorders or conditions cause. However, many of these disorders or conditions can be treated effectively with changes in behaviour or with medical therapies.

Snoring Statistics

It will be help to see snoring statistics, as snoring is a problem that affects such a wide range of the population.Below, we’ve compiled a list of some of the statistics we’ve come across when it comes to sleep disorders.As much as 30 percent of people aged thirty and above are snorers. The proportion rises to 40 percent when it comes to middle aged people.

Two thirds of all partnered adults say that their partner snores. When asked individually whether they snore or not, people responded with “yes” at a rate of 6 out of 10, or 59 percent.

There is an approximate ratio of 2:1 sufferers of snoring amongst men to women. However, this gap catches up after women reach menopause.

5.6% of children snore habitually.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, drowsy driving is responsible for at least 100,000 automobile crashes as well as 1,550 fatalities per year.

Approximately one half of all patients who have essential hypertension are also afflicted with obstructive sleep apnoea. In addition, approximately one half of all patients who have sleep apnoea have essential hypertension.

Approximately 9 percent of all men and 4 percent of all women between the ages of 30 and 60 are affected by sleep apnoea.

Patients with untreated obstructive sleep apnoea have a 3 percent risk of stroke and heart attack. The treatment for apnoea known as CPAP can be used to lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of stroke by approximately 20 percent.

0.7 percent to 10.3 percent of all children face problems with sleep apnoea.

Sleep apnoea may occur in as much as 20 to 40 percent of the adult population that are snorers.

The partner of someone afflicted with sleep apnoea loses approximately one hour of sleep per evening and may wake up as many as 21 times per hour, a side-effect of apnoea known as “Spousal Arousal Syndrome”.

A person that is afflicted with untreated obstructive sleep apnoea is up to four times as likely to have a stroke, as well as three times more likely to have heart disease.

Snoring women are significantly shorter in height and heavier in weight than their non-snoring counterparts, in addition to having a greater incidence of nasal problems.

People that are suffering from obstructive sleep apnoea are as much as six times more likely to be involved in a car crash then those without sleep disorders. This is due to the fact that they are drowsy from the condition.

It’s easy to see that snoring is a wide-ranged problem that can affect a multitude of facets of your personal health with these snoring statistics.

 

Responsible for many health issues, it is significant to get your snoring problem checked out, and do not ignore it, as it can affect not only you, but the lives of those around you. Act today, and save yourself from snoring problems."Food habits, lack of exercise, irregular sleep and varying working styles are basic reasons of sleep apnoea. Interestingly, patients don't take sleep disorders seriously which is a cause behind many other ailments including obesity, hypertension and diabetes,", and "Patients often come for the treatment of hypertension and diabetes while upon diagnosis it is revealed that sleep apnoea is one of the basic reasons for this disorder."

* 93 per cent of Indians are sleep deprived, getting less than 8 hours per night

* 58 per cent believe their work suffers due to lack of adequate sleep

* 11 per cent take leave from work because of lack of sleep

* 11 per cent have fallen asleep at work due to a poor night's sleep and 38 per cent witnessed a colleague falling asleep at work

* Lack of sleep also affects family relationships according to 19 per cent

 * 87 per cent of Indians say lack of sleep affects health

* 72 per cent of Indians are waking up 1 to 3 times per night

* 15 per cent wake up over stress at work

* 33 per cent Indians snore

* Up to 14 per cent snore as loud as or louder than talking

* Only 2 per cent of Indians discuss their lack of sleep with a physician(According to a Philips Healthcare survey)

 

 

 

 

 Snoring is the vibration of respiratory structures and the resulting sound due to obstructed air movement during breathing while sleeping. In some cases, the sound may be soft, but in most cases, it can be loud and unpleasant. Snoring during sleep may be a sign, or first alarm, of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Research suggests that snoring is one of the factors of sleep deprivation

The symptoms associated with OSA are:

 Snoring

Fatigue

Witnessed breath – holds

Gasping and choking

Excessive Daytime Sleeping(EDS)

Fragmented Sleep

Unrefreshing sleep

Reduced alertness

Mood changes

Nocturia Treatment

Almost all treatments for snoring revolve around lessening the breathing discomfort by clearing the blockage in the air passage. Medications are sometimes helpful in treating snoring symptoms, though they actually help to control some of the underlying causes such as nasal congestion and allergic reactions. Doctors, therefore, often recommend lifestyle changes as a first line treatment to stop snoring. This is the reason snorers are advised to lose weight (to stop fat from pressing on the throat), stop smoking (smoking weakens and clogs the throat), avoid alcohol and sedative medications before bedtime (they relax the throat and tongue muscles, which in turn narrow the airways) and sleep on their side (to prevent the tongue from blocking the throat).A number of other treatment options are also used to stop snoring. These range from over-the-counter aids such as nasal sprays, nasal strips or nose clips, lubricating sprays, oral appliances and "anti-snore" clothing and pillows, to unusual activities such as playing the didgeridoo. However, one needs to be wary of over-the-counter snore treatments that have no scientific evidence to support their claims, such as stop-snore rings or wrist worn electrical stimulation bands.Various surgeries can be done to treat snoring and sleep apnea like uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, laser assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency tissue volume reduction, nasal surgeries etc.To know more please contact: Dr. Jyotirmoy Biswas

For knowledge:

Myths and facts of snoring

Myth: Everybody snores, therefore it's normal.

Fact: Snoring is not a normal condition. Labelling it as 'normal' diminishes the seriousness of the condition. Snoring is not just about annoying your partner, it is a sign that the body is struggling to breathe properly during the night. Snoring on a frequent or regular basis has been associated with hypertension and can also be an indication of sleep apnea (pauses in breathing). Sleep apnea sufferers have been reported to have diminished gray cells in their brains, most likely due to the oxygen deprivation of untreated sleep apnea. If left untreated, sleep apnea increases the risk of cardiovascular disease over time. In addition, insufficient sleep affects growth hormone secretion that is linked to obesity. As the amount of hormone secretion decreases, the chance of weight gain increases.

Myth: Snoring only affects the health of the snorer.

Fact: Snoring doesn't just negatively affect the health of the person snoring, but also the health of the person lying next to them in bed. A typical snorer usually produces a noise that averages around 60 decibels (about the level of vacuum cleaner), but with some people this can reach 80 or even 90 decibels (about the level of an average factory). Sleeping with a partner who snores during the night has been shown to increase the blood pressure in the other person, which may be dangerous for their health in the long term. Snoring also causes the partner to have fragmented sleep and lose up to one hour of sleep every night

Myth: Snoring comes from the nose, so if I unclog my nose, my snoring will stop.

Fact: Having a stuffy nose can definitely aggravate snoring and sleep apnea, but in it's not the cause. A recent study showed that undergoing nasal surgery for breathing problems cured sleep apnea in only 10% of patients. Snoring vibrations typically come from the soft palate, which is aggravated by having a small jaw and the tongue falling back. It's a complicated relationship between the nose, the soft palate and the tongue.

 Myth: I know I don't snore, or have apnea. I am fine.

Fact: Don't ignore your wife when she tells you that your snoring doesn't let her sleep. When a partner snores it is very difficult for the spouse to sleep. There are people who snore excessively and suffer from sleep apnea, but feel absolutely normal. However, snoring increases their risk of getting a heart attack and stroke. The only definitive way to prove that you don't have sleep apnea is by taking a sleep test. Screening questionnaires like the GASP or the Epworth have shown high reliability in identifying patient risk for sleep apnea.

Myth: If I lose weight, I'll cure myself of sleep apnea.

Fact: Sometimes. It's definitely worth trying, but in general, it's very difficult to lose weight if you have sleep apnea. This is because poor sleep aggravates weight gain by increasing your appetite. Once you're sleeping better, it'll be easier to lose weight. This is the one ingredient with many dietary and weight loss programs that's missing or not stressed at all. It's not enough just to tell people to sleep more.

Myth: Health problems such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension and depression have no relation to the amount and quality of a person's sleep.

Fact: More and more scientific studies are showing a correlation between poor quality sleep and insufficient sleep with a variety of diseases. Blood pressure is variable during the sleep cycle, however, interrupted sleep negatively affects the normal variability. Recent studies have shown that nearly 80% cases of hypertension, 60% cases of strokes and 50% cases of heart failures are actually cases of undiagnosed sleep apnea. Research indicates that insufficient sleep impairs the body's ability to use insulin, which can lead to the onset of diabetes. Fragmented sleep can cause a lowered metabolism and increased levels of the hormone Cortisol which results in an increased appetite and a decrease in one's ability to burn calories.

Myth: Daytime sleepiness means a person is not getting enough sleep.

Fact: Do you feel very sleepy even during the day despite the fact that you had a long night of proper sleep? Excessive daytime sleepiness can occur even after a person gets enough sleep. Such sleepiness can be a sign of an underlying medical condition or sleep disorder such as narcolepsy or sleep apnea. Please seek professional medical advice to correctly diagnose the cause of this symptom.

Myth: Sleep apnea occurs only in older, overweight men with big necks.

Fact: Although the stereotypical description does fit people in the extreme end of the spectrum, we now know that even young, thin women that don't snore can have significant obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep apnea begins with jaw structure narrowing and later involves obesity. It's estimated that 90% of women with this condition are not diagnosed. Untreated, it can cause or aggravate weight gain, depression, anxiety, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, heart attack and stroke

Myth: Snoring can't be treated.

Fact: Have you given up on your snoring thinking that it cannot be treated? There are many different options for treating snoring.Some treatment options are rather drastic, possibly requiring surgery or prescription drugs, but prior to exploring such options it would be wise to first seek out alternative treatments. You must visit a sleep specialist to get the right diagnosis.

Myth: Extra sleep at night can cure you of problems with excessive daytime fatigue.

Fact: Not only is the quantity of sleep important but also the quality of sleep. Some people sleep eight-nine hours a night but don't feel well rested as the quality of their sleep is poor. A number of sleep disorders and other medical conditions affect the quality of sleep. Sleeping more won't alleviate the daytime sleepiness these disorders or conditions cause. However, many of these disorders or conditions can be treated effectively with changes in behaviour or with medical therapies.

Snoring Statistics

It will be help to see snoring statistics, as snoring is a problem that affects such a wide range of the population.Below, we’ve compiled a list of some of the statistics we’ve come across when it comes to sleep disorders.As much as 30 percent of people aged thirty and above are snorers. The proportion rises to 40 percent when it comes to middle aged people.

Two thirds of all partnered adults say that their partner snores. When asked individually whether they snore or not, people responded with “yes” at a rate of 6 out of 10, or 59 percent.

There is an approximate ratio of 2:1 sufferers of snoring amongst men to women. However, this gap catches up after women reach menopause.

5.6% of children snore habitually.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, drowsy driving is responsible for at least 100,000 automobile crashes as well as 1,550 fatalities per year.

Approximately one half of all patients who have essential hypertension are also afflicted with obstructive sleep apnoea. In addition, approximately one half of all patients who have sleep apnoea have essential hypertension.

Approximately 9 percent of all men and 4 percent of all women between the ages of 30 and 60 are affected by sleep apnoea.

Patients with untreated obstructive sleep apnoea have a 3 percent risk of stroke and heart attack. The treatment for apnoea known as CPAP can be used to lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of stroke by approximately 20 percent.

0.7 percent to 10.3 percent of all children face problems with sleep apnoea.

Sleep apnoea may occur in as much as 20 to 40 percent of the adult population that are snorers.

The partner of someone afflicted with sleep apnoea loses approximately one hour of sleep per evening and may wake up as many as 21 times per hour, a side-effect of apnoea known as “Spousal Arousal Syndrome”.

A person that is afflicted with untreated obstructive sleep apnoea is up to four times as likely to have a stroke, as well as three times more likely to have heart disease.

Snoring women are significantly shorter in height and heavier in weight than their non-snoring counterparts, in addition to having a greater incidence of nasal problems.

People that are suffering from obstructive sleep apnoea are as much as six times more likely to be involved in a car crash then those without sleep disorders. This is due to the fact that they are drowsy from the condition.

It’s easy to see that snoring is a wide-ranged problem that can affect a multitude of facets of your personal health with these snoring statistics.Responsible for many health issues, it is significant to get your snoring problem checked out, and do not ignore it, as it can affect not only you, but the lives of those around you. Act today, and save yourself from snoring problems."Food habits, lack of exercise, irregular sleep and varying working styles are basic reasons of sleep apnoea. Interestingly, patients don't take sleep disorders seriously which is a cause behind many other ailments including obesity, hypertension and diabetes,", and "Patients often come for the treatment of hypertension and diabetes while upon diagnosis it is revealed that sleep apnoea is one of the basic reasons for this disorder."

* 93 per cent of Indians are sleep deprived, getting less than 8 hours per night

* 58 per cent believe their work suffers due to lack of adequate sleep

* 11 per cent take leave from work because of lack of sleep

* 11 per cent have fallen asleep at work due to a poor night's sleep and 38 per cent witnessed a colleague falling asleep at work

* Lack of sleep also affects family relationships according to 19 per cent

* 87 per cent of Indians say lack of sleep affects health

* 72 per cent of Indians are waking up 1 to 3 times per night

* 15 per cent wake up over stress at work

* 33 per cent Indians snore

* Up to 14 per cent snore as loud as or louder than talking

* Only 2 per cent of Indians discuss their lack of sleep with a physician

(According to a Philips Healthcare survey)

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